Tuesday, October 1, 2013

Traditional Stories.


QUESTION PERIOD.
With Ted Jauw.


I regularly ask people for blog entry suggestions.  TJ – left this message on our Facebook page in early spring:

There used to be a village shaman. Do you see it becoming more democratized? Each our own shaman?

Do you see the 'medicine wheels' of the world coming together? Overlaying? Or interacting?

What do your elders say about these times and (as there become fewer of them) is there any urgency to further share what they know and add to what you already put forward?

As media creates a new collective consciousness (movies for instance) do you see a change in the language of dreams? Perhaps compared to oral tradition.

Can you talk about the pipe? It's relation to dreaming?

I'm fascinated by the use of common items that are now elevated to sacred. Marriage baskets, pipes, fans, etc. perhaps because we don't use them for their original mundane purposes?

Does your tradition have a clown tradition like heyoeka, koshare or windigokaan 'contraries'? How do they figure in dream work?

Ted JAUW

*****
There used to be a village shaman. Do you see it becoming more democratized; and each our own shaman?

The path of the Shaman is all about mystery and the unknown.  I think we can make predictions of where we think the path may lead; but based on personal experience it never ends up where you think it should…   So far in the last 2000 years the leading or governing authorities have always destroyed what supports Shaman energy. 

I’ve met people who lead churches, temples, nudist camps, sport teams, dietary programs and dog shelters etc…and many show the potential of Shaman energy.  I think lots of people are searching for clear, fair and honest leaders:  People who are willing to be in service to others (to listen, to help, to share, to be there and to show the way). The problem often is that people aren’t willing to let go of their expectations; their programs; and their need to always be right.  They want a leader who can be communal; but they aren’t willing to walk the path along side him or her. 
For a village, a tribe, a group, or a circle to work everyone has to be willing to walk the path together; and share similar values; as well as agree to follow a dominant voice. A leader can’t lead if the people aren’t willing at some degree to follow.  Democracy for me simply implies that “everyone has a perspective and a right to voice out this perspective.”  The Medicine Wheel is definitely the perfect example of “democracy” that works.  I believe that any village, which devotes to the Wheel’s philosophy and comes together behind a Shaman could make miracles.  I believe they have already… 

Honestly, if you look at our Planet today and humanity -- I don’t believe we are heading towards a reality where villages are devoted to one Shaman and Sacred Circle philosophy / psychology / LIVING.  Sorry! I can’t see it.  We are heading towards an unknown and a shamanic future I can’t yet perceive.  I see glimpses through some of the experiences, phenomenon, and perspectives coming from the next generation; but no absolutes.

Do you see the 'medicine wheels' of the world coming together? Overlaying? Or interacting?

No! One thing that all of my teachers have repeated through the last 30 years is that Medicine Wheels are built according to realities and memories stored in the Earth.  This means every Medicine Wheel is attached to its geography.  I’ve often imagined small wombs floating above the earth held by umbilical cords.  In each womb is a city, a village, a group of people, or an ecosystem etc…  In each womb lives a story / a dream.  When the story comes full circle and ends a Wheel shifts.  There’s a birth so to speak in the Realm of Creation – and another dream or another womb appears. 

I believe we are at a point in time where many old Wheels are coming to a close.  I don’t know what will come next and what form it will take.  For it to overlap or interact there would have to be important geological changes.  Is it possible? Yes of course; but it would certainly mean the end of the World as we know it and possibly, the end of a big chunk of humanity. 

TO TED: I have the feeling your question was deeper and implied a particular exploration.  If you would like to return and reformulate the question; continue the discussion I would love to revisit the question.

As media creates a new collective consciousness (movies for instance) do you see a change in the language of dreams? Perhaps compared to oral tradition.

I remember when my children were young.  They often dreamt of the characters they saw in movies or tv shows.  They were obviously influenced by the stories they were told whether it was through the television or the ones both my husband and I improvised.  It doesn’t matter where you get the imagery from – we humans behave the same way we used to 500 years ago.  We love stories!
The dreaming is made of stories.  Anything or anyone that dreams will feel pulled towards storytelling.  Honestly I don’t see much of a difference between the stories the media creates and the one our ancestors told.  They hold the same notion of interesting characters; dramatic or horrifying plots; and surprising endings. 

I’ve also noticed that our modern movies seem to follow themes and very often these are the same themes we find through nature and the stars.  Sincerely, we are continuing the same traditions just within a different medium.

Can you talk about the pipe? It's relation to dreaming?

Many years ago, G and I had the good fortune of working with a Pipe Carrier.  RT is Malacete, and showed us the beauty and power of the pipe.  He was able to reveal shadows in places we would have certainly overlooked (at the time) and with prayer and smoke was able to dissipate the darkness quickly.  We met other pipe carriers who couldn’t do this…  We soon came to realize that the pipe is a strong tool as long at the carrier trusts and believes in his or her prayers.  Like a drum – you need to regularly use the pipe and really make one with it.

For sure the pipe is a great tool for purification.  It can certainly serve a purpose when it comes to dreaming but honestly we’ve never used it.  On the other hand we often use smudging during our journeys, or circles and the burning of medicinal plants certainly helps people let go and enter the dreaming with more ease.

I’m definitely not an expert on the Pipe.  I personally have never smoked the pipe.  My lungs don’t like “smoke” period….  It’s not my path obviously.  I you are a pipe carrier and would like to explore the pipe and its purpose in the process of dreaming --- I’d certainly be up to an adventure.

I'm fascinated by the use of common items that are now elevated to sacred. Marriage baskets, pipes, fans, etc. perhaps because we don't use them for their original mundane purposes?

I personally believe that all things are sacred.  I find it sad to live in a modern, consumer base society where everyone sees objects and even animals / trees as insignificant.  We are already starting to treat one another this way…  Marriage is no longer a long term commitment and little by little we are disconnecting everything from the idea of Spirit. 

I believe we have elevated to sacred such objects as marriage baskets or belts; pipes, fans, drums etc…. because we want to return to sacredness everything that comes to us from the past or from tradition.  We are trying at this point to reclaim all that has existed and give it significance in our lives.  

Does your tradition have a clown tradition like heyoeka, koshare or windigokaan 'contraries'? How do they figure in dream work?

Our understanding of the Heyoka or the windigokan is nothing in comparison to what they once were.  In our tradition these old “Spirits” (so to speak) are but ribbons of energy moving through our people.  In the dreaming though as we reconnect to these “Spirits / stories” they begin to reconnect with us and to take shape in our daily living. 

G and I are Traditional Dreamers.  We are stepping away more and more from such titles as Shaman / Sorcerer because there are too many definitions or in our perspective --- misuse of the “words” or experiences.  Like Gérard pointed out during a Conference a few years ago: “These words are too private and too connected to our basic nature and soul to be share with others.  They are ours to explore, ours to work through, and ours to commit to. Nobody else’s and certainly not meant for a CV.”

The word “sacredness” has also changed and it’s becoming more and more difficult to navigate through nature’s momentum of evolution.  This isn’t new.  It’s the way of the Wheel and it’s the way of Shamanism.  There have been countless shifts and transformations since the start of humanity.  Our role, at least from our perspective, is to follow the dreaming.  It will bring us to where we need to be.

The Heyoka (the trickster) is no doubt still playing his / her games through the dreaming and affecting the lives of those who are willing to hear, to see, and to connect.   There was a time where people embodied the Heyoka and devoted to a life of clowning.  They were crucial in times where people didn’t have therapist, meds for depression, and grieving councilors.   Times have changed. And still, I see every day Heyoka attempting to return and inspire us all with its wisdom.  There are some amongst us who are still ready to commit and bring back this “Spirit” to our World.  I’ve been pleased to have met a few and if they are reading this blog – I would like them to know:  They are Medicine, Hope in my World.

As for the Windigokan, I can still remember hiding under the sheets as my grand-mother told us horrible stories about zombie type warriors who shape shifted into dinosaur birds to kill the enemy.  In some of these tales I almost cheered for these creatures while in other stories, I couldn’t wait to see them called back to the land of the dead.  One way or another, as far as I’m concerned these Spirits are better off hidden in the dreaming than roaming our waking reality.  They still inspire childlike fear in me and I can’t help but shutter at what they once were to our ancestors. 

The elders still tell stories of these creatures and others, to young children.  The tales have changed a bit but you can still find through the details this shrieking impression well worth today’s Hollywood, horror movies.  No matter what form these old traditional stories take there’s no way we can get rid of the wisdom, and teachings hidden behind the details.  What is difficult is finding the people nowadays capable of unlocking the old consciousness. 

This is why we feel traditional dreaming is a must.  People of tomorrow will need the dreaming and will need to understand the dreaming – to understand the underlying realities of their world. 

HAU!

1 comment:

Eric Côté said...

Windigokaan aren't windigo. -kaan in Ojibwe and Cree mean "not". Another meaning could mean " illness eater". Thank you.